Women Priests, LGBT Catholics

A fascinating blogpost at L’Espresso by Sandro Magister speculates that an article on women deacons at the authoritative “La Civiltà Cattolica” may have significance for the wider issue of women’s ordination.
For LGBT Catholics, the importance could be even closer to home. Consider these two paragraphs from the full text, in which I have made a simple change to just a few words – replacing “woman” and “women’s ordination” wherever it occurs, with “LGBT Catholics”.

Latest From Santa Marta. Open Doors For Women Priests – Settimo Cielo – Blog – L’Espresso

Moreover, another theologian adds, the “consensus fidelium” of many centuries has been called into question in the 20th century above all on account of the profound sociocultural changes concerning woman LGBT Catholics. It would not make sense to maintain that the Church must change only because the times have changed, but it remains true that a doctrine proposed by the Church needs to be understood by the believing intelligence. The dispute over women priests LGBT Catholics could be set in parallel with other moments of Church history; in any case, today in the question of female priesthood LGBT Catholics the “auctoritates,” or official positions of the magisterium, are clear, but many Catholics have a hard time understanding the “rationes” of decisions that, more than expressions of authority, appear to signify authoritarianism. Today there is unease among those who fail to understand how the exclusion of woman from the Church’s ministry can coexist with the affirmation and appreciation of her equal dignity.”

Source: Latest From Santa Marta. Open Doors For Women Priests – Settimo Cielo – Blog – L’Espresso

San Diego bishop calls for a practical ‘apology’ to L.G.B.T. Catholics | America Magazine

The fallout continued this week following the pope’s suggestion that the church should apologize to gay and lesbian people during his flight home from Armenia on June 26. (In fairness, Pope Francis also said an apology was due from the church “to the poor, to exploited women, to children exploited for labor…for having blessed many weapons.”)

The pope’s call for Christians to offer an apology to gay and lesbian people was also carefully welcomed this week by Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego. “I think it opens up a very helpful pathway to dialogue and hopefully healing,” he said. Pope Francis, Bishop McElroy said, brings to this dialogue with L.G.B.T. Catholics who feel marginalized by or alienated from the church a “renewed and deepened focus on the questions of accompaniment and the mercy of God for all of us.”

“We all walk together in a life of virtue and discipleship,” Bishop McElroy said, “and all of us fail at times.”

He adds: “We have to begin to incorporate that mercy into the depths of our hearts and souls in ways that are going to be uncomfortable for us…. We all need to be shown mercy; it is something that binds us together, not differentiates us.”

“What we need to project in the life of the church is ‘You are part of us and we are part of you.’ [L.G.B.T. Catholics] are part of our families.”

Source: America Magazine

Apologies Need to Be Supported by Structures in Both State and Church | Bondings 2.0

Several days ago, Bondings 2.0 reported on Munich’s Cardinal Reinhard Marx’s call for an apology by the Church to lesbian and gay people.  His call for apology preceded that of Pope Francis by several days.  The cardinal made his remarks at a press conference in Ireland last week, after he had given a speech at a meeting on church and state relations.

Our blog post was based on information from an IrishTimes news story.  Since that time, The National Catholic Reporter (NCR) filed a story on Marx’s speech, bringing to light some other, stronger comments he made while meeting with journalists.

NCR reported:

“Marx, who is president of the German bishops’ conference and a member of the pope’s advisory council of nine cardinals, called on not just the church to apologize to gays and lesbians, but society as a whole, which he said was implicated in this ‘terrible scandal.’

” ‘The history of homosexuals in our society is a very bad history because we have done a lot to marginalize them. It is not so long ago and so as church and as society we have to say sorry.’ “

Source: Bondings 2.0

Cardinal Marx: Church Owes Apology to Gays

A notable and extremely welcome feature of last year’s family synod was the apology offered by the entire German speaking bishops’ small group to the gay and lesbian community, for the harm done to them by the church. That call was later repeated by Bishop Doyle of Northampton, on his return to the UK.

Now, Cardinal Reinhard Marx of Munich and Freising, who is chairman of the German Catholic Bishops’ Conference and also a close advisor to Pope Francis, has repeated his belief in the church’s duty of apology.

We’re going to hear more about apologies and calls for apologies to lesbian and gay Catholics for past wrongs to lesbian and gay people. That’s good news.

What would be better, if we could also hear apologies for wrongs to transgender people – and for continuing harms done to LGBT people by the Church in many parts of the world in its pastoral practice, and by the Church itself for some elements of its teaching and language.

Catholic Church Should Apologize to Gay People, Says Top Adviser to Pope Francis

The Catholic Church should apologize to lesbian and gay people for the harm it has caused to them, said a top cardinal and close advisor to Pope Francis.

Cardinal Reinhard Marx of Munich and Freising, speaking to the Irish Times after his address at a Dublin conference, said:

” ‘The history of homosexuals in our societies is a very bad history because we’ve done a lot to marginalise [them]. . .As church and society, we’ve also to say “sorry, sorry.”

“Until ‘very recently’, the church, but also society at large, had been ‘very negative about gay people . . .it was the whole society. It was a scandal and terrible.’ “

Marx was in Dublin at Trinity College for the Loyola Institute’s conference, “The Role of Church in a Pluralist Society: Good Riddance or Good Influence?” He called for the church to engage positively with the world, acknowledging historical periods when “Christian faith wasn’t on the right side” of societal developments.

Source:  Bondings 2.0

When forbidden sexuality meets unchanging religious tradition

Orlando vigil II

Multiple reports are surfacing that Pulse nightclub shooter Omar Mateen’s profile was found on gay dating apps, that he had tried to pick up men and that on prior occasions he had patronized the Orlando club in which he massacred so many on Sunday (June 12).

If this is true, it matters a very great deal.

It might move the motivation for Mateen’s horrific act to a very different and psychologically more complex place in which one man’s inability to reconcile himself with his sexuality cost 49 other people their lives — and then cost him his own life.

It might end up making the motivation of the horrifying Orlando massacre look more like: I want you. God says I can’t want you. So I must kill you.

Source:  Religion News Service

Orlando Statement

As lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Catholic members of All Inclusive Ministries (AIM), based at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, in Toronto, ON, we share in the suffering and sorrows resulting from the Orlando mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub on June 12, 2016. Targeted for their sexual orientations and gender identifications, 49 people were killed and 53 people were wounded. We offer up our prayers for everyone affected by this terrible tragedy and especially the victims and their families and friends.

We at AIM know what it means to be marginalized by society, and the dangers of being discriminated against because of extremist interpretations of religious doctrines. We believe that the way forward out of the cycle of homophobia and violence is to be full participants in the life of the Church and society, and for that reason AIM serves as a bridge between the Catholic Church and its lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender members.

On Saturday, June 25, 2016 starting at 7 p.m., AIM will hold its monthly Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Parish in Toronto, Ontario. The Mass will include a liturgical memorial ceremony for the Orlando victims. We also will be praying for every lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender person throughout the world who face oppression, intimidation and violence. We invite everyone to attend.

Sincerely,

The All Inclusive Ministries Executive Council
allinclusiveministries.org
aimtoronto@gmail.com

Source: Orlando Statement

CoE Cathedral Flying Rainbow Flag!

There is a rainbow flag flying at Portsmouth Cathedral

There is a rainbow flag flying at Portsmouth Cathedral.  On Friday, this will be replaced by an even bigger rainbow flag.  We had planned to fly one over the weekend in support of Portsmouth Pride happening on Saturday, but, along with many other churches and buildings around the country, we decided to fly one this week to remember those killed, injured or effected by the horrendous attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando this week.  We are praying for those who have been killed or injured and for all those who love them.  We are praying for those around the world who have been effected by this extreme act.  We are praying for those LGBT+ people around the world who are subjected to abuse, discrimination and persecution because of their sexuality.

Portsmouth Cathedral will continue to mourn with, stand alongside, support and welcome the LGBT+ community. We rejoice that God has made us who we are and that includes our sexuality, whether gay or straight and when you come here you do not need to pretend to be someone else.  You and your partner / boyfriend / girlfriend / husband / wife are welcome here – you do not have to hide who you are.  Come and be yourself with us as we seek to love God, find out more about God and serve the world God created.  Come and offer your gifts and skills and wisdom to us.

Source: Portsmouth Cathedral