Time for a renunciation of anti-contraception doctrine by the Catholic Church | Irish Examiner

1968’s ‘Humane Vitae’ has done massive harm to the Catholic Church and has been largely ignored by many, writes TP O’Mahony

Time for a renunciation of anti-contraception doctrine by the Catholic Church

It is surely time for an open, direct, and formal renunciation of Humanae Vitae — the 1968 anti-contraception encyclical from Pope Paul VI.

This ill-conceived document has caused enormous harm, not least to papal authority, and been the source of worry, stress, and misery for millions of Catholic couples around the globe.

It’s publication on July 25, 1968, caused widespread disappointment and even dismay, and sparked a huge controversy.

At the time, I wrote that the crisis it created was the greates the Catholic Church had faced since the Reformation in the 16th century.

In retrospect, that was no exaggerated claim, and today — nearly 50 years later — we are still living with the divisions stemming from that encyclical. In the aftermath of its appearance, millions of Catholics stopped going to confession and many others abandoned the Church altogether.

Source:Irish Examiner

New Book on Gay Marriage Raises the Bar on Love

Honestly, it was hard for me to read this book. Even as an avid reader, it was hard to stick with it; however, it wasn’t hard for the reasons readers might assume. Some might jump to assume that it wasn’t well-researched, or well-written, or both. Some might even assume that it wasn’t catchy enough to compete with our social media saturated culture.

Print

 Not so! Confronting Religious Denial of Gay Marriage: Christian Humanism and the Moral Imagination by Ms. Catherine Wallace is thoroughly researched, gracefully written, and enviably witty.

This book is like a hot date: engaging, intellectually seductive, and charming to boot.

(Prediction: If there were more books out there like this, we’d take longer breaks from Instagram. We would opt for page turners over photo uploaders!)

 

(Read the full review by Kat Katsanis-Semel at Huffington Post)

Will 2nd Largest Catholic Country Boldly Move Forward on LGBT Equality? | Bondings 2.0

Will the world’s second largest Catholic country boldly advance LGBT rights? This is the question being asked after Mexico’s president announced a new rainbow political agenda in late May.

President Enrique Peña Nieto said he would ask Congress to legalize marriage equality, non-discrimination protections for same-gender couples seeking to adopt, and the ability for people to self-identify their gender on government records.

These moves are significant and somewhat unexpected from a president whose popularity has waned. Mexicans are split over LGBT issues, though legal rights have progressed slowly through state legislatures and the courts. Last year, the Mexican Supreme Court ruled state marriage equality bans unconstitutional which makes the president’s announcement more a symbolic gesture, but a welcome one, say some pundits. On the adoption item, Fusion explained the background to the president’s move:

Source: Bondings 2.0

Tutu quits church after gay marriage | IOL

Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu’s daughter Reverend Canon Mpho Tutu-Van Furth has decided to quit her job after her licence to preach was revoked.

Mpho told City Press she may no longer officiate in church because she married a woman.

Newlyweds Mpho and Marceline Tutu-Van Furth are on honeymoon in Bali after their wedding at a Franschhoek wine estate attended by Mpho’s parents, Leah and Desmond Tutu.

Mpho told the newspaper she had decided to “give up” her ministerial duties – her authority to preside at Holy Communion, and to officiate at weddings, baptisms and funerals in South Africa.

Source: IOL

Tutu forced to quit over gay marriage | City Press

Reverend Canon Mpho Tutu-Van Furth has revealed that her licence to preach is being revoked because she married a woman – so, she’s decided to quit instead.

Newlyweds Mpho and Marceline Tutu-Van Furth are on honeymoon on the Indian Ocean island of Bali after their wedding at a Franschhoek wine estate attended by Mpho’s parents, Leah and Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu.

“Bali is quite magical,” said Mpho in an email to City Press, adding that she had decided to “give up” her ministerial duties – her authority to preside at Holy Communion, and to officiate at weddings, baptisms and funerals in South Africa.

“Because the South African Anglican Church does not recognise our marriage, I can no longer exercise my priestly ministry in South Africa,” she said. “The bishop of the Diocese of Saldanha Bay [Bishop Raphael Hess] was instructed to revoke my licence.

“I decided that I would give it to him rather than have him take it, a slightly more dignified option with the same effect.”

While same-sex marriage was legalised in South Africa in 2006, the South African Anglican law on marriage states: “Holy matrimony is the lifelong and exclusive union between one man and one woman.”

Source:  City Press

Kirk votes to allow gay clergy marriages – BBC News

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland has voted to allow ministers to continue to serve if they are in a gay marriage.The historic vote on the first day of this year’s gathering in Edinburgh draws a line under a row which has split the Kirk for nine years.Commissioners voted by 339 votes to 215 in favour of the move.The decision means that same sex civil marriage will be permitted for ministers.However, they will not themselves be allowed to conduct gay weddings within the church.

Source: – BBC News

Bénédiction des couples homosexuels, un an de débats chez les protestants – La Croix

Il y a un an, l’Église protestante unie de France (EPUdF) adoptait à la quasi-unanimité une mesure permettant aux pasteurs de bénir des couples homosexuels. Cette décision a suscité de nombreux remous au sein du protestantisme français et lancé une vaste réflexion au sein de la Fédération protestante de France sur ce qui unit de nombreuses Églises très différentes les unes des autres.

Source: La Croix

Methodists Inching to LG(B)T Inclusion

After years of stalemate, the United Methodist Church is now inching towards inclusion, with the appointment of a commission of bishops to reassess the rules. This may look like a punt into the long grass, but it could be more. Unlike the Catholic Church, the Methodist bishops are generally more favourable to lgbt inclusion than the laity, and in other denominations, formal investigations or study groups have led to some degree of progress. Also, note that this specifically includes transgender, as well as gay and lesbian.

United Methodist Church to Reassess Rules on Gays and Marriage

After 44 years of debating sexuality issues, the United Methodist Church voted by a narrow margin on Wednesday to allow bishops to appoint a commission to re-evaluate rules on gay, lesbian and transgender clergy and marriage.

The 428-to-405 vote by the delegates to the church’s quadrennial conference in Portland, Ore., was seen by many as a last-ditch effort to save the church from schism.

It was celebrated by L.G.B.T. Methodists and their supporters as a way to buy time and avoid church discipline against more than 100 clergy and clergy candidates who came out as gay in advance of the conference.

But it disappointed many conservatives who were exasperated that their church is still arguing over what they see as clear church teachings that prohibit openly gay and transgender clergy, and same-sex marriage.

Source:  – The New York Times

Despite Vatican Opposition, Italy Passes Civil Unions Bill for Lesbian and Gay Couples 

In what is being referred to as a rejection of Vatican influence into Italian politics,  the Italian Parliament voted in a civil unions bill this week, becoming the final nation in the 28-member European Union to do so.

Prime Minister Matteo Renzi had called a confidence vote, as a way to prevent further delays and amendments, and he received a victory of 369-193. A later vote on the actual bill in the lower house of Parliament resulted in a tally of 372-51, with 99 abstentions, paving the way for civil unions to become the law of the land. The Senate had already approved the bill in February.

Rome’s Trevi Fountain was lit up in rainbow colors to celebrate the passage of the civil unions bill.

In their news report of the decisive vote, The New York Times stated:

“It was a historic occasion for a nation that is still dominated by the Roman Catholic Church, which opposed the measure, and where traditional family norms are still strong.”

Source:  Bondings 2.0

Will Gay Man’s Employment Case Settlement With Catholic School Affect Future Cases? 

Matthew Barrett (left) with husband, Ed Suplee

Matthew Barrett has received a settlement in  his suit against a Massachusetts Catholic high school which had rescinded their contract with him to be the food service director after they learned that he was legally married to another man.

The Boston Globe reported that the details of the financial settlement are undisclosed, but that the decision means the school, Fontbonne Academy, Dorchester, will not appeal a 2015 state court decision that the school discriminated against Barrett after listing his husband on an emergency contact form.

That earlier decision, which found the school discriminated against Barrett, was the first of its kind, according to legal experts, because it did not allow the school to claim a religious exemption to the state’s anti-discrimination law.  The Globe reported that Barrett’s lawyer predicted that the settlement arrived at this week will have wide ramifications for future employment cases:

Source:  Bondings 2.0